About

About

In 2014, with the support and encouragement of Governor Matthew H. Mead, the Wyoming State Legislature allocated $15 million in funding for the design, construction and operation of an integrated test center to study the capture, sequestration and management of carbon emissions from a Wyoming coal fired power plant. Read more >

Innovation

Innovation

To protect our nation’s abundant fossil fuel resources for the long term, we must perfect and deploy technologies that can effectively capture carbon molecules directly from power plants’ flue gas, prevent those molecules from being emitted directly into the atmosphere and do so at an affordable price that makes this an economically viable solution. Read more >

Partners

Partners

The ITC is a public-private partnership that brings together government, industry and cooperatives with the shared goal of developing commercially viable uses for carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. Read more >

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  • How It Works
  • Wyoming Energy
  • The Coal Story

The ITC will be built at Basin Electric Power Cooperatives Dry Fork Station, located seven miles north of Gillette, Wyoming. Researchers at the ITC will have access to flue gas otherwise released from the plant, a combination of ambient air, water vapor and carbon dioxide.

A steel duct will connect the plants gas flue to the ITC. Technology positioned inside the plants’ exhaust flue will allow researchers to divert flue gas to their testing facility when and as needed, where carbon dioxide molecules can be pulled and utilized. Read more >

From coal, oil, gas, uranium and wind—Wyoming is the leading exporter of British Thermal Units (BTUs) to the rest of the country. In 2010, Wyoming produced 10.5 quadrillion BTUs but consumed only 0.5 quadrillion BTUs within the state’s borders. In a global context, if Wyoming were a country, it would rank 10th in overall energy production. 10.5 quadrillion BTUs is greater than the energy consumed by all 114 million U.S. households in a single year. Read more >

Every day, more than 80 trains, each a mile long, roll out from Wyoming, the nation’s top coal producing state, to power plants in 37 states. These trains hauled more than 397 million tons of the 401 million tons of coal produced in 2012. There are sufficient coal reserves in Wyoming to keep producing at our current rate for the next 140 years. Read more >

“I can’t wait to see what great minds come up with to reimagine CO2. I believe the innovations will be breathtaking and make a profound difference in the future of coal,” Governor Matt Mead said of the Integrated Test Center.